Author: DbY4tvWKsp

Scientists are reengineering viruses to fight antibiotic resistance


The world is in the midst of a global “superbug” crisis. Antibiotic resistance has been found in numerous common bacterial infections, including tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and salmonellosis, making them difficult – if not impossible – to treat. We’re on the cusp of a “post-antibiotic era,” where there are fewer treatment options for such antibiotic-resistant strains. Given estimates that antibiotic resistance will cause 10 million deaths a year by 2050, finding new methods for treating harmful infections is essential. Strange as it might sound, viruses might be one possible alternative to antibiotics for treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages (also known as phages) are viruses…

This story continues at The Next Web

The Eve Spectrum is a high-res, stylish gaming monitor at a great pice


Choosing a monitor is a game of compromise. Want a 4K panel? Give up any dreams of a high refresh rate, or pay an exorbitant price. Want 240Hz? Kill the resolution and image quality. There are also vanishingly few options with a decent collection of ports, let alone ones that can run and transmit power via USB-C. The Eve Spectrum wants to fix all that. Eve first made waves with the Eve V – a Surface Pro lookalike that took basically everything people loved about Microsoft’s tablet and packed it with enthusiast features at a reasonable price. The Spectrum follows…

This story continues at The Next Web

Sucks to be you, Dyson — company repays grant money back to UK government


It must suck to be Dyson at the moment. The UK government has recouped nearly all of its £8 million grant it gave to the British vacuum cleaner manufacturer to develop an electric vehicle, the Telegraph reports. Dyson was given the money back in 2016 as part of government plan to stimulate the economy and create jobs. In part, the money was going to help Dyson‘s development and expansion into the electric car market. The vacuum maker reportedly put $2.5 billion into developing its electric vehicle. [Read: The Dyson V11… or how I learned to stop worrying and love vacuuming]…

This story continues at The Next Web

Bitcoin Gold hit by 51% attacks, $72K in cryptocurrency double-spent


Malicious cryptocurrency miners took control of Bitcoin Gold‘s blockchain recently to double-spend $72,000 worth of BTG. Bad actors assumed a majority of the network‘s processing power (hash rate) to re-organize the blockchain twice between Thursday and Friday last week: the first netted attackers 1,900 BTG ($19,000), and the second roughly 5,267 BTG ($53,000). Cryptocurrency developer James Lovejoy estimates the miners spent just $1,200 to perform each of the attacks, based on prices from hash rate marketplace NiceHash. This marks the second and third times Bitcoin Gold has suffered such incidents in two years. Double-spenders like to target cryptocurrency exchanges Any entity…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Bitcoin

Report: Tinder’s new panic button is sharing your data with Facebook and YouTube


Last year, an investigation by ProPublica, BuzzFeed, and Columbia Journalism Investigations found more than 150 instances of sexual assault involving dating apps. Approximately 10 percent involved users being matched with dates who had previously been accused or convicted of sexual assault. Last week, Tinder took a small step to give users a peace of mind when meeting up with someone: Introducing a “panic button” — this feature shares a users exact location and connects them with local emergency services in the event of feeling unsafe or in danger. While the dating app could do more to ensure a convicted sexual…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: YouTube,Facebook,Tinder

Engineers bet on hydrogen-fueled zero emission rocket to break land speed record


Engineers behind the British Bloodhound Land Speed Record (LSR) vehicle are turning their eyes to hydrogen power for their next record attempt. The team plan to use a zero emission rocket powered by concentrated hydrogen peroxide, all that will be emitted is water and oxygen Motoring Research reports. [Read: New hydrogen trains could put an end to diesel] But how does it work? I hear you ask. According to the Bloodhound team, the rocket will use hydrogen peroxide, water with an extra oxygen molecule (H2O2), which will be pumped at very high pressures through silver gauze. When the H2O2 comes…

This story continues at The Next Web

Report: Cloudflare provided CDN services to sites hosting exploitative child content


For the ongoing series, Code Word, we’re exploring if — and how — technology can protect individuals against sexual assault and harassment, and how it can help and support survivors. Cloudflare, a cloud company that provides security and content distribution services, provided CDN (Content Delivery Network) services to sites that host Child Sexual Abuse Material (CSAM). CDN refers to a group of geographically distributed servers that host site data to provide faster access to people visiting that website. L1ght, an Israel-based company working to provide a safe environment to children online, shared a report with TNW containing details of the websites featuring…

This story continues at The Next Web

Satoshi Nakaboto: ‘Bitcoin is now worth as much as Nike’


Our robot colleague Satoshi Nakaboto writes about Bitcoin every fucking day. Welcome to another edition of Bitcoin Today, where I, Satoshi Nakaboto, tell you what’s been going on with Bitcoin in the past 24 hours. As Isaac Newton used to say: Let’s get it! Bitcoin price We closed the day, January 26 2020, at a price of $8,596. That’s a respectable 2.77 percent increase in 24 hours, or $232. It was the highest closing price in three days. We’re still 57 percent below Bitcoin’s all-time high of $20,089 (December 17 2017). Bitcoin market cap Bitcoin’s market cap ended the day…

This story continues at The Next Web

Or just read more coverage about: Bitcoin

Brexit saves UK from the terrible EU copyright laws it helped create


Last year, the majority of EU states voted in favor of the controversial EU Copyright Directive, which its opponents say will greatly harm free speech online and open source initiatives. All EU countries have to implement it before June 2021, but now the UK — one of the member states that originally backed the legislation — has declared it will not adopt the directive as it’ll not be obligated to do so post Brexit, BBC reports. The remark about the decision, made by the country’s Universities and Science Minister, Chris Skidmore, will likely be celebrated by online platforms and content…

This story continues at The Next Web