Category: Basics

This is why you shouldn’t use Apple’s highlighter tool to censor sensitive info


A recent Reddit post details the danger of using a popular built-in tool in the iOS image editing menu. The tool, commonly referred to as the highlighter (it’s actually a chisel-shaped marker, don’t @ me) is often used to cover sensitive information in screenshots or photographs — such as credit card numbers or the address on a drivers license. The problem is in the default opacity of the tool. It’s meant to be used as a highlighter, not a tool to censor sensitive details, and as such it’s set with an opacity value under 100. That is to say, it’s…

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You can now hide replies to your tweets — here’s how


Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. Earlier this year, Jane Manchun Wong, a security researcher with a knack for revealing yet-to-launch software features by reverse engineering apps, tweeted that Twitter was testing a “replies moderation” tool. Today, Twitter officially rolled out the feature globally, giving you “more control over your conversations” with the ability to hide replies to your tweets.  The moderation tool gives you the option to hide replies to your tweets, but also allows others to see and…

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How to easily access the elusive em-dash — on Windows and Mac


Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. Nobody loves an em-dash more than I do — I put an em-dash on anything. It really is a wonderful grammatical tool. You can use it to dictate the pace of your writing, to bring more attention to an argument, to add extra information without cluttering a sentence. It truly is a gift to writing — and you should absolutely use it. Unfortunately, the em-dash — and the en-dash (–) for that matter — is…

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Or just read more coverage about: Windows