Category: Syndication

A brief history of bad logo redesigns — and what designers can learn from them


Did you know we have an online conference about product design coming up? SPRINT will cover how designers and product owners can stay ahead of the curve in these unprecedented times. Logo redesigns are a lot like a tightrope act—on a windy day, in a pouring rain, no nifty balancing pole or safety net below. The risks are high, and the margin for error is thin. What’s at stake? Confusion. Outrage. Social media “shame-on-you”s. We form deep, emotional ties with logos. The shock of change has the power to trigger a disproportionate reaction regardless of a redesign’s quality. Social media logo…

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New study suggests this extremely dense star cluster is stunting planet formation


Using the Hubble Space Telescope researchers have conducted a pioneering 3-year study of the massive dense young star cluster Westerlund 2. In the process, discovering that dense clouds of relatively cool dust are curiously absent from material around the stars at the cluster’s heart. As these dense clouds are the seeds of planets that form over the course of millions of years, thus, planet formation is stunted in these regions. The astronomers believe that this dearth of dense dust and gas discs is a result of the cluster’s most massive and powerful stars eroding and dispersing them from around their…

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The case for biometric authentication — and why we should ditch passwords


According to Forbes, business leaders from a variety of industries have joined forces to face one unexpected enemy. That enemy? Log-ins and passwords. The group includes such giants as PayPal, Amazon, Visa, MasterCard, and Aetna. The unnamed members of the group are the millions of people who throw their “password” book across the room because none of the listed log-ins and passwords ever seem to work. We are all united in our hatred of log-ins and passwords, but what is the alternative? There has to be some way to combat fraud. There has to be a way to protect our accounts.…

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Who’s allowed to track my kids online?


For two decades children’s digital privacy in the United States has been regulated by a national law: the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. The law limits how companies can collect data on children under 13 years old. If website operators don’t properly adhere to the rules outlined in the act, they could face massive fines. In September, the Federal Trade Commission announced a record-breaking penalty against YouTube, in which the Google-owned service agreed to pay $170 million to settle alleged COPPA violations. But the law has also faced criticism, with some lawmakers and advocates arguing that it doesn’t go far enough.…

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Ohio’s government is helping its residents switch to EVs — cutting 1,850 tons of CO2


This article was originally published by Sarah Wray on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. New figures show that 3,323 electric vehicles (EVs) were sold in Columbus, Ohio over the last three years, exceeding the target of 3,200. Consumer likelihood to purchase an EV also grew by more than 20 percent. The Electrification Program was developed after Smart Columbus, a public-private smart city initiative led by the City…

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How to detect unwanted bias in machine learning models


In 2016, the World Economic Forum claimed we are experiencing the fourth wave of the Industrial Revolution: automation using cyber-physical systems. Key elements of this wave include machine intelligence, blockchain-based decentralized governance, and genome editing. As has been the case with previous waves, these technologies reduce the need for human labor but pose new ethical challenges, especially for artificial intelligence development companies and their clients. The purpose of this article is to review recent ideas on detecting and mitigating unwanted bias in machine learning models. We will discuss recently created guidelines around trustworthy AI, review examples of AI bias arising…

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Get the fundamentals of DevOps right — then worry about tools


Even though the DevOps methodology has been with us for quite some time now, it’s still the center of heated discussions. Companies want it but are unsure of how to approach it. DevOps is everywhere. And while it’s an interesting trend, it should be fitted to products, not the other way around. But some people don’t see it that way. I’m often asked questions such as: “Do you think we should start using Docker, or jump straight into Kubernetes?” Such questions are meaningless without even knowing what the product is about. All those fancy terms—cloud, Kubernetes, containers, configuration management, Infrastructure-as-Code—promise some…

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How to reboot shared mobility in a post-pandemic world


Shared mobility must reinvent itself somewhat to adapt to the coming challenges resulting from COVID-19. Operators, software developers, vehicle manufacturers, and public services will all need to be creative in order to find ways to deal with a wide range of social/technical/business issues created or exacerbated by the pandemic. In this article (in 6 parts), we will explore a few ideas on how to build resilient shared mobility solutions for the near future. 1. Safety & hygiene: reconnect with riders Hygiene is perhaps the most significant psychological barrier to shared mobility usage in this era of COVID-19. While scooters, bikes,…

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Prehistoric climate change damaged the ozone layer and led to a mass extinction, study finds


Mass extinctions are very important to how life evolved on Earth. For example, when an asteroid hit the Earth 66 million years ago, the resulting dinosaur extinction led mammals to take their place. My colleagues and I have published new research on the mass extinction that took place 359 million years ago at the boundary between the Devonian and Carboniferous geological periods. There have been many previous speculations as to the cause of this event, including volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts, climate change, sea level changes, wildfires and the rise of the first forests. But we have shown that the extinctions…

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Astronomers found an Earth-like exoplanet orbiting the solar system’s nearest star


Proxima b an Earth-like exoplanet orbiting in the habitable zone of the nearest star to our own in the Proxima Centauri solar system — located just 4.2 light-years from Earth — has been confirmed by an international team of astronomers from the University of Geneva. The team used the Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets and Stable Spectroscopic Observations (ESPRESSO) spectrograph, attached to the Very Large Telescope (VLT) located in the Chilean desert to make their observation. The team’s findings are published in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Proxima b, an exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star, was initially detected four years ago by…

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