Category: Riding Nerdy

Muto’s $1,800 ebike is a wonderfully simple and adaptable ride that’s fit for life about town


Welcome to Riding Nerdy, TNW’s fortnightly dive into bicycle-based tech, where we go into too much detail and geek out on all things related to pedal-powered gadgets. When ebike startup Muto got in touch to tell us about their debut machine, also called the Muto, I jumped at the chance to use it as my daily commuter for a week — and boy I’m glad that I did.  [Read: Here’s how many cyclists it takes to charge a Tesla as fast as a Supercharger] My colleagues have reviewed quite a few ebikes here on TNW, but I’ve personally never had…

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Here’s how many cyclists it takes to charge a Tesla as fast as a Supercharger


How many cyclists does it take to charge a Tesla? No, this isn’t the start to a bad joke, it’s a legitimate question. It’s also one that Finnish record breaker show Ennätystehdas (or The Record Factory) managed to answer. Whether you actually should charge your Tesla using captive cyclists is another question entirely, though. [Read: Engineer finds Tesla Model 3 is secretly equipped with hardware for powering homes] Given how little power the average cyclist generates compared to cars and how big Tesla batteries are, it should come as no surprise that you’d need a hell of a lot of…

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Or just read more coverage about: Tesla

This GTA V mod lets you ride your own bike around Los Santos


With lockdown measures enforced around the globe, exercising indoors has had a bit of a boom — particularly indoor cycling. Online video game-like training platforms like Zwift have brought new realms of realism to the activity, but this ingenious GTA V mod has taken it to a whole other level. In short, the GTBikeV mod lets you ride your real bike around GTA V’s massive virtual world, Los Santos, almost as if you were actually there. The mod allows you to connect your bike and smart trainer to the game, so as you pedal your indoor exercise bike, your in-game…

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Zwift companion app not working? Try this


Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. Over the past winter, and sporadically ever since, I’ve been using virtual the video game-like cycle training platform Zwift and a Tacx NEO indoor smart trainer. It’s allowed me to exercise with focus and efficiency when I’m crunched on time or the weather outside is not so great (or you know, lockdown). But I’ve had a huge problem with its “companion app” — and I’m not alone — but I’ve finally found a fix!…

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‘Strava Wankers’ pokes fun at the worst people in society — tryhards


Welcome to Riding Nerdy, TNW’s fortnightly dive into bicycle-based tech, where we go into too much detail and geek out on all things related to pedal-powered gadgets. Since lockdown measures around the world have forced gyms and health clubs to close, many more people are exercising outside, where it’s free. The side effect is that everyone has seemingly pivoted to fitness tracking app, Strava. Seriously, the amount of notifications telling me my Facebook friends have just joined Strava has been kind of surprising. Not because I don’t have any friends, but because I don’t really expect this kind of behavior…

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SRAM dialed my bike rides up to 12 with its radical wireless electronic gears


A certain professional cyclist who allegedly won the Tour de France seven times famously said: “It’s not about the bike.” British author and round the world cyclist, Rob Penn, later wrote a book detailing a build of his dream bike entitled: “It’s all about the bike.” And well, they’re both kind of right. Let me explain, by means of a convoluted review. [Read: Canyon’s latest race bike is hella expensive — but you get what you pay for] Recently, I’ve been test riding an undeniably nice, super-high end race bike from German manufacturer Canyon. You can read my initial thoughts…

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Canyon’s latest race bike is hella expensive — but you get what you pay for


Welcome to Riding Nerdy, TNW’s fortnightly dive into bicycle-based tech, where we go into too much detail and geek out on all things related to pedal-powered gadgets. Despite everything that’s going on in the world at the moment, I have been very lucky. Here in the Netherlands, we’re still allowed to go cycling, so long as it observes social distancing. Which is just as well, because last week, the folks at German online-only direct-to-consumer bike manufacturer Canyon, sent me a brand-spanking new race bike to put through its paces.  Before diving in deep, in typical Riding Nerdy fashion, here are…

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Pro and amateur cyclists meet in VR amid coronavirus race cancellations


It’s not just football, basketball, Formula 1, golf, and baseball that have been canceled due to the coronavirus outbreak, professional road cycling has taken a big hit too. At this time of year, most races take place across Northern Europe in many of the regions affected by the virus. As such, races are being canceled left, right, and center and many professional teams, like Mitchelton-Scott and INEOS, are actively avoiding the ones that were scheduled. But professional cyclists aren’t letting the situation stop them — they’re taking racing online. [Read: How this VR video game is transforming indoor cycle training]…

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Smart trainers have made cycling indoors far less shit


Welcome to Riding Nerdy, TNW’s fortnightly dive into bicycle-based tech, where we go into too much detail and geek out on all things related to pedal-powered gadgets. I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with cycling indoors. On one hand, it’s a great way to stay fit through winter, but on the other hand, it’s so boring I’d rather stab myself in the thigh with a rusty compass. But thanks to modern technology, it’s getting a lot more exciting. Perhaps to the point where I only need to slap myself with a spatula to keep things interesting. [Read: How…

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This indoor cycling app is making me suffer, and it’s highly effective


Welcome to Riding Nerdy, TNW’s fortnightly dive into bicycle-based tech, where we go into too much detail and geek out on all things related to pedal-powered gadgets. In November last year, I started using Zwift, an online gaming-come-indoor cycle training platform. Whilst still remaining very much in a niche, over the past few years its popularity has exploded in the cycling world. But it’s not the only option, and it certainly wasn’t the first digital tool designed to take the monotony out of cycling indoors. After finishing a six-week training plan on Zwift, I thought I’d try out “The Sufferfest,”…

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