Category: Tech

The case for biometric authentication — and why we should ditch passwords


According to Forbes, business leaders from a variety of industries have joined forces to face one unexpected enemy. That enemy? Log-ins and passwords. The group includes such giants as PayPal, Amazon, Visa, MasterCard, and Aetna. The unnamed members of the group are the millions of people who throw their “password” book across the room because none of the listed log-ins and passwords ever seem to work. We are all united in our hatred of log-ins and passwords, but what is the alternative? There has to be some way to combat fraud. There has to be a way to protect our accounts.…

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Who’s allowed to track my kids online?


For two decades children’s digital privacy in the United States has been regulated by a national law: the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act. The law limits how companies can collect data on children under 13 years old. If website operators don’t properly adhere to the rules outlined in the act, they could face massive fines. In September, the Federal Trade Commission announced a record-breaking penalty against YouTube, in which the Google-owned service agreed to pay $170 million to settle alleged COPPA violations. But the law has also faced criticism, with some lawmakers and advocates arguing that it doesn’t go far enough.…

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Watch: Unboxing a $1,000 mail order electric car from China


China makes and consumes more electric vehicles than any other nation in the world. It just so happens to make some of the most bizarre ones too. The good folks over at Jalopnik, an online motoring magazine, have given us a look behind the curtain with one of their latest videos. In it, they unbox what is apparently world’s cheapest new car. The all-electric Changli — no, I’d never heard of it either. Jason Torchinsky, Jalopnik’s senior editor, has the pleasure of unveiling the unique ride and, well, it’s certainly cheap. While the “car” started out at around $930 (Torchinsky got…

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Ohio’s government is helping its residents switch to EVs — cutting 1,850 tons of CO2


This article was originally published by Sarah Wray on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. New figures show that 3,323 electric vehicles (EVs) were sold in Columbus, Ohio over the last three years, exceeding the target of 3,200. Consumer likelihood to purchase an EV also grew by more than 20 percent. The Electrification Program was developed after Smart Columbus, a public-private smart city initiative led by the City…

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Report: GM adds electric van to its upcoming EV fleet in a bid to rival Tesla


Cars and vans are all slowly shifting to electric power as governments around the world tighten emissions regulations. I know it, you know it, and General Motors knows it too. In an exclusive interview with Reuters, employees from the US car making titan revealed that the company is working on a whole host of electric vehicles — at least 20 of them — for release over the next three years. [Read: Germany orders all fuel stations to provide electric charging points] The lineup also reportedly includes a commercial vehicle platform, a van in other words, that is set to rival…

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Or just read more coverage about: Tesla

How to detect unwanted bias in machine learning models


In 2016, the World Economic Forum claimed we are experiencing the fourth wave of the Industrial Revolution: automation using cyber-physical systems. Key elements of this wave include machine intelligence, blockchain-based decentralized governance, and genome editing. As has been the case with previous waves, these technologies reduce the need for human labor but pose new ethical challenges, especially for artificial intelligence development companies and their clients. The purpose of this article is to review recent ideas on detecting and mitigating unwanted bias in machine learning models. We will discuss recently created guidelines around trustworthy AI, review examples of AI bias arising…

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Autonomous cars won’t prevent as many accidents as we’ve been told, study says


Some 94% of vehicle crashes are caused by humans. This figure is often touted by autonomous vehicle developers when they try to promote the potential value in their tech. It sounds logical: remove humans and road safety will improve dramatically. However, the improvements might not be as dramatic as we’d hope for. According to a new study from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), only one third of vehicle accidents will be avoided if we pivot to autonomous cars or “robotaxis,” AP reports. The main benefits of autonomous vehicles are that they can’t get drunk or sleepy and can…

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Get the fundamentals of DevOps right — then worry about tools


Even though the DevOps methodology has been with us for quite some time now, it’s still the center of heated discussions. Companies want it but are unsure of how to approach it. DevOps is everywhere. And while it’s an interesting trend, it should be fitted to products, not the other way around. But some people don’t see it that way. I’m often asked questions such as: “Do you think we should start using Docker, or jump straight into Kubernetes?” Such questions are meaningless without even knowing what the product is about. All those fancy terms—cloud, Kubernetes, containers, configuration management, Infrastructure-as-Code—promise some…

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Fitbit’s low-cost COVID-19 ventilator receives emergency FDA approval


Fitbit this week revealed the Flow, an inexpensive ventilator the company developed for the express purpose of helping alleviate the need for such devices in the coronavirus pandemic. It can be used in hospitals, though not to replace traditional ventilators. The Flow is designed around standard resuscitator bags used by paramedics, and is designed to be “simple to use,” according to Fitbit. It has a clear window on the side so healthcare workers can observe the bag pumping, and additional sensors for monitoring patients and control over the volume and pressure of the oxygen. It was granted FDA Emergency Use…

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Coming out trans in tech: An entrepreneur’s experience


Welcome to 🏳️‍🌈TNW Pride 2020!🏳️‍🌈 All throughout June we’ll highlight articles that focus on representation for LGBTQPIA+ people in the STEM communities. Let me start this off right. I am transgender. I am a trans woman in tech. And I am an opportunity that you don’t want to miss.  I’ve been working in tech for 10+ years now – ever since I started selling MySpace design and automation as a teenager. I’ve worked with some of Australia’s biggest technology companies and startups, collectively valued at hundreds of millions of dollars, mentored in the Microsoft Accelerator and consulted for VC funds.…

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