Category: Tech

Twitter embeds fact-checking links in Trump’s lying tweets


It looks like Twitter’s finally had enough of US President Donald Trump‘s abuse of its platform. Today, keen observers may have noticed the president‘s @realDonaldTrump Twitter account has been splashed with a couple of fact-checking embeds on tweets where he’s attempted to misinform the US voting public by lying about the mail-in ballot process. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time Twitter’s embedded links in the president’s tweets. The result comes after a Memorial Day weekend where the platform saw Trump spend a significant amount of time lashing out at his perceived enemies, including a critic…

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It’s time to shark up y’all


Coronavirus in Context is a weekly newsletter where we bring you facts that matter about the COVID-19 pandemic and the technology trying to stop its spread. You can subscribe here. Hola Earthlings, A few months back, when our beards were shorter and our fuses were longer, we collectively took solace in Netflix‘s “Tiger King” and Nintendo’s Animal Crossings: New Horizons. Remember that? Those were simpler times. We identified with the tigers in their cages – not only were they locked up, but somehow the damn tigers ended up being extras in a show with the word “Tiger” in its name. It seemed weird at…

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Here’s how many cyclists it takes to charge a Tesla as fast as a Supercharger


How many cyclists does it take to charge a Tesla? No, this isn’t the start to a bad joke, it’s a legitimate question. It’s also one that Finnish record breaker show Ennätystehdas (or The Record Factory) managed to answer. Whether you actually should charge your Tesla using captive cyclists is another question entirely, though. [Read: Engineer finds Tesla Model 3 is secretly equipped with hardware for powering homes] Given how little power the average cyclist generates compared to cars and how big Tesla batteries are, it should come as no surprise that you’d need a hell of a lot of…

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Zwift companion app not working? Try this


Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. Over the past winter, and sporadically ever since, I’ve been using virtual the video game-like cycle training platform Zwift and a Tacx NEO indoor smart trainer. It’s allowed me to exercise with focus and efficiency when I’m crunched on time or the weather outside is not so great (or you know, lockdown). But I’ve had a huge problem with its “companion app” — and I’m not alone — but I’ve finally found a fix!…

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UK getting 200 mile route to test self-driving vehicles on public roads


A mobility consortium in the UK has begun work on a real-world test route for self-driving vehicles as part of local government trials exploring the future of mobility tech. The project, led by Midlands Future Mobility, is building the route to include 300 km (190 miles) of roads around the University of Warwick, Coventry, Solihull, and central Birmingham, Coventry Live reports. [Read: Engineer finds Tesla Model 3 is secretly equipped with hardware for powering homes] It should give autonomous vehicles a mix of urban, rural, suburban, and motorway roads to navigate. It will also take in important transport hubs including…

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Technology start-ups that fail fast succeed faster


Failure rates of new technology-based companies are shockingly high. It is estimated that 75% of technology start-ups do not generate profits. Other data suggest upwards of 90% of new technology enterprises completely fail. However, some failures of products or technologies have been positive and lead to success. It took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts before he succeeded with his lightbulb design. Although learning from failure has been described as critical to the success of technology-based start-ups, there is little existing research that supports this claim. Strategic management scholars have described and found support for a number of organizational philosophies, behaviors,…

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Algorithms associating appearance with criminality have a dark past


‘Phrenology’ has an old-fashioned ring to it. It sounds like it belongs in a history book, filed somewhere between bloodletting and velocipedes. We’d like to think that judging people’s worth based on the size and shape of their skull is a practice that’s well behind us. However, phrenology is once again rearing its lumpy head. In recent years, machine-learning algorithms have promised governments and private companies the power to glean all sorts of information from people’s appearance. Several startups now claim to be able to use artificial intelligence (AI) to help employers detect the personality traits of job candidates based…

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Coding is a language — and that’s why kids can learn it faster than you


Across the world, the conversion of information into a digital format – also called “digitalization” – has increased productivity in the public and private sectors. As a result, virtually every country in the world is working towards a digital economy. As this new economy evolves, special skills like computer programming are needed. This is like a language of numbers, known as code, which allows people to write instructions that are executed by computers. The goal is to create something: from a web page to an image, to a piece of software. Early coding languages emerged in the 1940s. These were…

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Everything you need to know about neuromorphic computing


In July, a group of artificial intelligence researchers showcased a self-driving bicycle that could navigate around obstacles, follow a person, and respond to voice commands. While the self-driving bike itself was of little use, the AI technology behind it was remarkable. Powering the bicycle was a neuromorphic chip, a special kind of AI computer. Neuromorphic computing is not new. In fact, it was first proposed in the 1980s. But recent developments in the artificial intelligence industry have renewed interest in neuromorphic computers. The growing popularity of deep learning and neural networks has spurred a race to develop AI hardware specialized for neural…

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How to use pre-trained models in your next business project


Most of the new deep learning models being released, especially in NLP, are very, very large: They have parameters ranging from hundreds of millions to tens of billions. Given good enough architecture, the larger the model, the more learning capacity it has. Thus, these new models have huge learning capacity and are trained on very, very large datasets. Because of that, they learn the entire distribution of the datasets they are trained on. One can say that they encode compressed knowledge of these datasets. This allows these models to be used for very interesting applications—the most common one being transfer learning. Transfer learning is fine-tuning pre-trained models on…

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